When it comes to braided lines, there are tons of things to like about them.
 
They are thin and robust, not to mention very durable. It allows you to feel your lure or bait smoothly. Plus, it has little to no memory.
 
Moreover, there is one wrong move that some anglers make that costs them money and time. They replace their braided line more often than it should be.
 
A braided line can last on a reel for reels, unlike monofilament. It doesn’t lose its performance.
 
However, we have here two reasons for what would cause you to replace your braided line.
 
Let’s see what those reasons are and dive in!

WHEN SHOULD YOU CHANGE YOUR BRAIDED LINE?

You know already that braided lines are durable and robust. That’s why you usually don’t need to change it more often than every couple of years.
 
Moreover, these are the two reasons that we recommend when putting a new line on your reel:
 

1. Frayed line

2. The insufficient line left on your spool

FRAYED BRAID ON YOUR FISHING LINE

A frayed line means a weak one. A frayed braid sign that you might want to look out for is the fuzziness compared to the line’s left and right sides.
 
There’s a perfect time to change your fishing line. It’s when you pull a ton of line out from your spool then, it’s all frayed.
 
Also, it’s a sign that the line roller on bail has some debris, damage, or corrosion. So make sure you check it out and make sure it freely spins.
 
Moreover, you can check out the guides on your rod for chips. Especially the leading guide.
 
By swabbing a Q-Tip around the inside of each guide, you can see the result.
 
There might have a chip in there that could be fraying your line if something snags the cotton.
 
Don’t forget about the line fraying and color fraying. It’s easy to be overlooked.
 
Although the color will fade over time, the fuzziness is what you should look out for.

CHANGE YOUR BRAID WHEN THERE’S NOT ENOUGH LEFT ON THE SPOOL

Over time, when you tie on clip tag ends and new leaders. You have to cut off frayed sections of your line or cut wind knots out. Then, it will be shorter.
 
Two things can happen when it gets shorter:
 

1. You might get spooled if you hook into a big fish

2. You’ll lose casting distance

 
So, change it right away when you notice that your reel becomes less full of line and it loses its casting distance.

CONCLUSION

Since a braided line can last on your reel for so many years, there’s no need to change it.
 
However, here are some instances of when you need to change it out:

1. You don’t have that much braid left on your spool

 

2. A lot of lines is frayed

 
To reduce the chances of your line getting frayed: Make sure that your reels and rods are debris, chip, and corrosion-free.